Posts Tagged ‘crime’

The one place that everyone should feel safe is at home.

Sometimes, we forget that when we’re in the safety of our home to keep vigilant and alert, especially when we are coming or going.

Ladies, here are some important safety precautions to remember at home.  However, everyone should be aware of these tips too.

  • Always have your key ready before you get to your front door and pay attention to what’s around you.
  • Keep ALL windows and doors locked at all times when you’re away from your residence no matter what the temperature is outside.
  • Keep your front entrance area well lit, replace light bulbs regularly, and make sure that fixtures are in good working order.  If possible, have motion lights installed in addition to the regular outside lights.
  • If you arrive home and find your front door open: DO NOT GO INSIDE, call the police immediately from your cell phone, neighbor’s house, or pay phone.
  • If you live in an apartment, list only your last name and first initial on your mailbox.
  • Don’t buzz someone in to your building or apartment complex unless you know them.
  • The same goes for holding the door open for someone that you don’t know that has been waiting.  Don’t let anyone into your building or apartment complex that you don’t know.
  • If a stranger needs to use your phone in an emergency, keep them out, and offer to make the call for them.
  • If you ever have ANY doubt or feel threatened in any way, call the police.  Report anything that seems suspicious to the police immediately.

These are just a few important safety precautions to remember when you’re at home, especially when you’re alone.  Everyone should always feel safe and secure inside their own home.

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Be sure to check out crime, criminology, and book updates:

Author Blog: http://authorjenniferchase.com/

Book & Crime Talk:  http://blogtalkradio.com/jennifer-chase

Books: Compulsion  Dead Game  Dark Mind  Silent Partner  Screenwriting

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Citizens Unite! 

If you are a victim of ANY crime – Report It!

If you’re robbed on the street, someone breaks into your house, or you’ve been swindled – Report It! 

It has been reported from law enforcement agencies that one out of every two crimes goes unreported.  It’s either because victims don’t think that the police can do anything about it or they just don’t want to get involved.

It can’t be stressed enough that if crimes go unreported then the criminals are going to continue to operate without any interference.  Reporting ALL crimes will help law enforcement to assign the appropriate number of officers to troubled locations, and information provided by victims and witnesses can lead to the arrest and prosecution of a criminal. 

Your local law enforcement agency needs your help to fight crime.

1.                  Report ALL crimes to your local police department.

2.                  No fact is too trivial.

3.                  Report ANY and ALL suspicious activities in your neighborhood.

4.                  Get help immediately or call 9-1-1.

5.                  If the crime just occurred or is in progress, call 9-1-1.

6.                  Call a doctor, if necessary.

7.                  Call a friend or family member.

8.                  Try to remember ALL details, such as clothing, hair color, vehicle descriptions, identifiable marks or features, etc.

9.                  Try not to destroy any possible evidence.

10.              Keep important emergency and non-emergency numbers available, such as victim’s services, crime stoppers, police department, vehicle abatement, animal control, etc.

For more information about crime and emergencies, please don’t hesitate to contact your local police department or community service officer.

If you’re interested in starting a neighborhood watch:

http://www.usaonwatch.org/

http://www.neighborhoodlink.com/article/Community/Neighborhood_Watch_How_To_Start

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Blog: www.authorjenniferchase.com/
Website: www.jenniferchase.vpweb.com/
Crime Watch Blog: www.emilystonecrimewatch.wordpress.com/
Book & Crime Talk: www.blogtalkradio.com/jennifer-chase/
Books: Compulsion = Dead Game = Silent Partner = Screenwriting

It’s true that you can deter a potentially dangerous situation by just being aware and conscious of your surroundings.  Try to read between the lines.  I’ve actually practiced this a few times.  I find that if you’re confident, aware, focused, use appropriate eye contact, and don’t show any fear, you’re ten times more likely to avoid being targeted as a victim or get caught up in something uncertain. 

There are many books available that talk about how to use your survival signals to help protect us from violence.  I wanted to share some highlights that I found interesting.  I can’t express enough that we need to pay attention to that “inner voice” alerting you to something that doesn’t appear or feel right.  Of course, this isn’t always a potentially dangerous situation.  It can be an uncomfortable or a high stress situation.   

There are many messengers of intuition that are worth your attention.  Stop and acknowledge them, think about what’s behind these feelings.

Fear

Apprehension

Suspicion

Doubt

Gut feelings

Hunches

Curiosity

Anxiety

Wonder

Persistent thoughts

Nagging feelings

According to the book The Gift of Fear by Gavin De Becker, there are seven survival signals we need to be aware of when placed in uncertain, new, or potentially dangerous situations.  Learn to look between the actions and pay close attention to your intuitions when confronted.

Forced Teaming

This technique is an effective way to manipulate a situation of premature trust, such as “we’re in the same boat”.  The detectable signal of “forced teaming” is the projection of a shared experience.

Charm & Niceness

Think of charm, such as rapport, is having a motive.  Now the difference between “charm” and “charming”, it can be a bit deceiving.  Look behind the person’s charm.  Most of the time it will be harmless, but other times there can be a manipulation beneath it.   

Too Many Details

It has been studied that when someone wants to deceive you, they give you too many details.  Commonly, when people are telling the truth, they don’t feel a need for extra details of a situation.

Typecasting

This involves a slight insult to warrant an easy refute.  For example, a man stops a woman and says to her “You’re probably too snobbish to talk to me”, hoping to get a rebuttal response.  A potential rapist or mugger to avert your attention from the situation could use this technique. 

Loan Sharking

This is classic example of someone using this technique that you owe them something, which makes it difficult to ask them to leave you alone.  Criminals use this technique as the kindly stranger.  Be aware and read between the intentions.

Unsolicited Promise

This is one of the most reliable signals where a stranger makes a promise and most likely has a questionable motive.  Take a good look at the situation. 

 Discounting the Word “No” 

This is a fairly self-explanatory technique to observe.  If someone doesn’t take “no” for answer, there is most likely another motivation.  

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Blog: www.authorjenniferchase.com/
Website: www.jenniferchase.vpweb.com/
Crime Watch Blog: www.emilystonecrimewatch.wordpress.com/
Book & Crime Talk: www.blogtalkradio.com/jennifer-chase/
Books: Compulsion = Dead Game = Silent Partner = Screenwriting

Closed or solved homicides are described as either “cleared by arrest” or “cleared by exceptional means”.  In 2008, there were 16,272 reported homicides with a clearance rate of 64%.  That means that 5,858 homicides remain unsolved for that year.

According to the U.S. Department of Justice, the reporting law enforcement agency must adhere to specific guidelines for “cleared” homicides. 

 Cleared by Arrest: 

  • Suspect(s) were arrested.
  • Suspect(s) were charged with the commission of the offense.
  • Suspect(s) were turned over to the court for prosecution.

 Cleared by Exceptional Means:

  • The offender(s) have been identified.
  • Enough gathered evidence to support an arrest warrant, make a charge, and turn offender over to the court for prosecution.
  • The offender(s) exact location has been identified and can be brought into custody immediately.
  • Law enforcement has encountered a circumstance outside their control that prohibits the agency from arresting, charging, and prosecuting the offender.

Clearance rates seem to be declining over the years.  What appears to be the problem?  Not enough police personnel?  Not enough qualified detectives?  Are we raising too many killers?  Is murder just a part of our society? 

Here are some interesting statistics to ponder:

2008, 16,272 homicides, 64% clearance, 5,858 unsolved

2007, 16,929 homicides, 61% clearance, 6,602 unsolved

2006, 17,030 homicides, 61% clearance, 6,642 unsolved

2000, 15,586 homicides, 63% clearance, 5,767 unsolved

1990, 23,438 homicides, 67% clearance, 7,735 unsolved

1980, 23,040 homicides, 72% clearance, 6,451 unsolved

1975, 78% clearance rate

1970, 86% clearance rate

1965, 90% clearance rate

1960, 91% clearance rate

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Blog: www.authorjenniferchase.com/
Website: www.jenniferchase.vpweb.com/
Crime Watch Blog: www.emilystonecrimewatch.wordpress.com/
Book & Crime Talk: www.blogtalkradio.com/jennifer-chase/
Books: Compulsion = Dead Game = Silent Partner = Screenwriting

Heroine Emily Stone from my two novels Compulsion and Dead Game has dedicated her life to finding and protecting children.  It’s not always a happy ending, but she won’t give up the search when a child is reporting missing or abducted.  She uses her innate profiling abilities and every piece of technology available to anonymously search out children and their perpetrators. 

In real life, it has been estimated through surveys of households, juvenile residential facilities, and law enforcement agencies that there are approximately 58,200 non-family abductions every year.  This high number is shocking to say the least.  We need to be vigilant to keep our children safe.

The National Incidence Studies of Missing, Abducted, Runaway, and Thrownaway Children (NISMART) has conducted two studies during the years 1997- 1999.  It is difficult to get the exact number due to many variables to missing children cases and reporting status.  

Here are some highlights in NISMART’s report:

Characteristic of Child Abducted

 0-5 years old  7%   (4,300)

6-11 years old  12%  (6,800)

12-14 years old  22%  (13,000)

15-17 years old  59%  (34,100)

 

Gender of Child Abducted

 Male  35%

Female  65%

 

Region of Child Abducted

Northwest  1%  (100)

Midwest  33%  (19,300)

South  38%  (21,900)

West  29%  (16,900)

 

Characteristic of Perpetrator

Friend  17%

Long-Term Acquaintance  21%

Neighbor  5%

Authority Person  6%

Caretaker or Babysitter  4%

Stranger  37%

Slight Acquaintance  8%

Someone Else  3%

 

Age of Main Perpetrator’s Age

 13-19 years  25%

20-29 years  42%

30-39 years  12%

40-49 years  16%

50-59 years  5%

 

Blog: www.authorjenniferchase.com/
Website: www.jenniferchase.vpweb.com/
Crime Watch Blog: www.emilystonecrimewatch.wordpress.com/
Book & Crime Talk: www.blogtalkradio.com/jennifer-chase/
Books: Compulsion = Dead Game = Silent Partner = Screenwriting

Heroine Emily Stone from my two novels Compulsion and Dead Game has dedicated her life to finding and protecting children.  It’s not always a happy ending, but she won’t give up the search when a child is reporting missing or abducted.  She uses her innate profiling abilities and every piece of technology available to anonymously search out children and their perpetrators. 

In real life, it has been estimated through surveys of households, juvenile residential facilities, and law enforcement agencies that there are approximately 58,200 non-family abductions every year.  This high number is shocking to say the least.  We need to be vigilant to keep our children safe.

The National Incidence Studies of Missing, Abducted, Runaway, and Thrownaway Children (NISMART) has conducted two studies during the years 1997- 1999.  It is difficult to get the exact number due to many variables to missing children cases and reporting status.  

Here are some highlights in NISMART’s report:

Characteristic of Child Abducted

0-5 years old  7%   (4,300)

6-11 years old  12%  (6,800)

12-14 years old  22%  (13,000)

15-17 years old  59%  (34,100)

Gender of Child Abducted

Male  35%

Female  65%

Region of Child Abducted

Northwest  1%  (100)

Midwest  33%  (19,300)

South  38%  (21,900)

West  29%  (16,900)

Characteristic of Perpetrator

Friend  17%

Long-Term Acquaintance  21%

Neighbor  5%

Authority Person  6%

Caretaker or Babysitter  4%

Stranger  37%

Slight Acquaintance  8%

Someone Else  3%

Age of Main Perpetrator’s Age

13-19 years  25%

20-29 years  42%

30-39 years  12%

40-49 years  16%

50-59 years  5%

No information  1%

 

Blog: www.authorjenniferchase.com/
Website: www.jenniferchase.vpweb.com/
Crime Watch Blog: www.emilystonecrimewatch.wordpress.com/
Book & Crime Talk: www.blogtalkradio.com/jennifer-chase/
Books: Compulsion = Dead Game = Silent Partner = Screenwriting

 

I try to keep up to date on various things in the forensic and criminology fields when I’m not writing.  Basically, I read and study whenever I have a spare moment.  Sometimes when I come across information that really makes me pause for a moment and take a deep breath in disbelief, I feel compelled to post it.

I just read a report from the United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime (UNODC) on the statistics of human trafficking.  This is a significant problem and seems to be steadily rising worldwide.

  • 161 countries are reported to be affected by human trafficking by being the source, transit, and/or destination country.
  • 2.45 million people are estimated to be trafficked at any given time.
  • There is an estimated 1.2 million children trafficked each year.
  • The majority of trafficking victims are between the ages of 18 – 24.
  • 95% of trafficking victims experience physical and sexual violence during trafficking.
  • 79% of trafficking victims are trafficked for sexual exploitation.
  • 18% of trafficking victims are trafficked for forced labor.
  • 66% of victims are adult women.
  • 20% of victims are minors.

 

Jennifer Chase
Award Winning Author & Criminologist

Blog: www.authorjenniferchase.com/
Website: www.jenniferchase.vpweb.com/
Book & Crime Talk: www.blogtalkradio.com/jennifer-chase/
Books: Compulsion = Dead Game = Silent Partner = Screenwriting