Posts Tagged ‘emily stone series’

The one place that everyone should feel safe is at home.

Sometimes, we forget that when we’re in the safety of our home to keep vigilant and alert, especially when we are coming or going.

Ladies, here are some important safety precautions to remember at home.  However, everyone should be aware of these tips too.

  • Always have your key ready before you get to your front door and pay attention to what’s around you.
  • Keep ALL windows and doors locked at all times when you’re away from your residence no matter what the temperature is outside.
  • Keep your front entrance area well lit, replace light bulbs regularly, and make sure that fixtures are in good working order.  If possible, have motion lights installed in addition to the regular outside lights.
  • If you arrive home and find your front door open: DO NOT GO INSIDE, call the police immediately from your cell phone, neighbor’s house, or pay phone.
  • If you live in an apartment, list only your last name and first initial on your mailbox.
  • Don’t buzz someone in to your building or apartment complex unless you know them.
  • The same goes for holding the door open for someone that you don’t know that has been waiting.  Don’t let anyone into your building or apartment complex that you don’t know.
  • If a stranger needs to use your phone in an emergency, keep them out, and offer to make the call for them.
  • If you ever have ANY doubt or feel threatened in any way, call the police.  Report anything that seems suspicious to the police immediately.

These are just a few important safety precautions to remember when you’re at home, especially when you’re alone.  Everyone should always feel safe and secure inside their own home.

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Be sure to check out crime, criminology, and book updates:

Author Blog: http://authorjenniferchase.com/

Book & Crime Talk:  http://blogtalkradio.com/jennifer-chase

Books: Compulsion  Dead Game  Dark Mind  Silent Partner  Screenwriting

It’s difficult to find someone today who isn’t online surfing the Internet, exchanging email, and participating in online social networks.  It’s incredible to realize how far we’ve come in our technology and communication activities within the past ten years.

With all the great technological advancement, there also comes the more devious aspects to it as well.  Think about how you use your computer and what information you’ve shared.

There are some safety tips that everyone should be familiar with in their online environment to make it the most positive and fun experience.

General Tips:

  • Understand how different networking sites work before you decide to join.  What are the benefits and downfalls?  Know how others will view your pages and your information.
  • Take charge of your profile and use controls over your information and restrictions to your page.
  • Keep your full name, Social Security number, phone number, address, and any banking information private and to yourself.
  • Post ONLY information that you feel comfortable with others seeing and knowing about you.  Take the time to think about this before you post anything.  Remember, you can’t take the information back once it’s posted.
  • Trust your gut instinct if you have any suspicions or if someone threatens you.  Report it to the police.

General Security:

  • Don’t use public or shared computers for online banking transactions.
  • Never give out your account information or passwords.
  • Be cautious about opening any attachment or download from emails regardless of who sent them.  Make sure that you have an up to date virus software, spyware, and firewall on your computer.
  • Delete junk mail without reading it.
  • Don’t “unsubscribe” to unwanted or unsolicited emails.  This just alerts senders that they’ve reached a valid email address.  Don’t sign up for free offers.

Parent Alert Tips: 

  • Teach your children about privacy and personal information.  You can encourage them to post information only with your permission and supervision.
  • Explore the Internet with your children and keep the computer in a common area.
  • Show your children the difference between and advertisement and entertainment.
  • Be aware of places your child is using on the Internet, such as friend’s house or library.  Consider safeguarding options, such as blocking, filtering and monitoring.
  • Discuss with your children if they ever feel threatened or uncomfortable to tell an adult immediately.

Helpful websites for more information:

Federal Trade Commission

www.OnGuardOnline.gov

ConnectSafely

www.connectsafely.org

Cyberbully411

www.cyberbully411.org

GetNetWise

www.getnetwise.org

Internet Keep Safe Coalition

www.iKeepSafe.org

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Author Website & Blog: http://authorjenniferchase.com/

Books on Amazon

There are times that we find ourselves going out at night for fun or a special celebration.  You could be going to a restaurant or nightclub to meet friends.  Or, you could be meeting someone for the first time in a public place.

It’s so important to remember that even though you’re in a pubic place, you still need to be alert and vigilant about what’s going on around you.  This is true for both women and men.

Here are some simple safety tips to remember as you venture out into the nightlife for fun and entertainment:

  • Be sure to tell someone, friend, neighbor, or family member where you’re going.
  • DO NOT accept drinks from someone if you didn’t see the drink being prepared. 
  • DO NOT leave your drink unattended for ANY period of time — EVER.
  • DO NOT leave your purse or handbag unattended for ANY period of time.
  • Carry a cell phone and always have enough money for a taxi ride home if necessary.
  • If at all possible, arrange a buddy system with a friend to keep watch of one another.
  • Know where all emergency and/or fire exits are in the building.  Know your outside surroundings, such as streets, landmarks, etc.  
  • If you plan on drinking, ALWAYS have a designated driver or take a taxi.
  • NEVER leave a bar or nightclub with a stranger.
  • If you’re being a harassed or if something doesn’t seem right to you don’t hesitate to report it to a security guard, nightclub bouncer, or the police.

Most importantly…

Have a great time! 

Just take a few moments to remember these tips before you venture out for some fun nightlife and pass these tips on to friends, family, and coworkers.

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Blog: www.authorjenniferchase.com/
Website: www.jenniferchase.vpweb.com/
Crime Watch Blog: www.emilystonecrimewatch.wordpress.com/
Book & Crime Talk: www.blogtalkradio.com/jennifer-chase/
Books: Compulsion = Dead Game = Silent Partner = Screenwriting

It’s the holiday time again!

This is the time where many of us are busy, with not only everyday things, but with shopping, holiday decorating, parties, and much more.  This is also the time where we need to be careful in protecting our families and homes from burglaries, identity theft, and assault. 

The holidays can be a time where potential criminals use it to their advantage because often times we are distracted and staying vigilant.

Here are a few simple reminders for home and shopping safety during the holiday season.

Home Safety

1.                  Be extra cautious about locking ALL windows and doors when you leave the house, even if you’re gone for only a few minutes.  Also, make sure that your windows and doors are properly bolted for added security.

2.                  Be careful of large displays of holiday gifts visible through windows and doors of your home.  This can be too tempting for “would be” burglars.

3.                  If you’re leaving your home for any extended length of time, have a neighbor, friend, or family member keep an eye on your home and pick up newspapers and mail.

4.                  Have indoor and outdoor lights on an automatic timer.

5.                  If possible, leave a radio or television on to give the appearance of an occupied home.

Shopping Safety

1.                  Try to do your holiday shopping during daylight hours, if possible.  If you have to shop at night, go with a friend or family member.

2.                  Dress comfortably and casually, and avoid wearing expensive jewelry.

3.                  Try NOT to carry a purse or wallet, if possible.  Always carry your driver’s license or ID card, checks or credit cards that you plan on using for your shopping excursion.  Try to keep these items in a front pocket. 

4.                  Avoid carrying large amounts of cash.  Try to pay for purchases with a check or credit card whenever possible.

5.                  If your credit card(s) are lost or stolen, notify the credit card issuer immediately.  Also, if it has been stolen, notify the police and file a report.  Make sure to keep a record of ALL your credit card numbers in a safe place at home.

6.                  ALWAYS stay alert to your surroundings.

7.                  Avoid overloading yourself with packages.  Make sure that you have a clear visibility and are able to move around freely.

8.                  Keep packages out of plain view in your car.  Put them in the trunk or out of plain sight.

9.                  Beware of strangers approaching you for ANY reason.  This time of year where there are many “con artists” that will try to distract your attention to take your belongings or money.

Most of all, have a wonderful holiday season with family and friends.

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Blog: www.authorjenniferchase.com/
Website: www.jenniferchase.vpweb.com/
Crime Watch Blog: www.emilystonecrimewatch.wordpress.com/
Book & Crime Talk: www.blogtalkradio.com/jennifer-chase/
Books: Compulsion = Dead Game = Silent Partner = Screenwriting

Citizens Unite! 

If you are a victim of ANY crime – Report It!

If you’re robbed on the street, someone breaks into your house, or you’ve been swindled – Report It! 

It has been reported from law enforcement agencies that one out of every two crimes goes unreported.  It’s either because victims don’t think that the police can do anything about it or they just don’t want to get involved.

It can’t be stressed enough that if crimes go unreported then the criminals are going to continue to operate without any interference.  Reporting ALL crimes will help law enforcement to assign the appropriate number of officers to troubled locations, and information provided by victims and witnesses can lead to the arrest and prosecution of a criminal. 

Your local law enforcement agency needs your help to fight crime.

1.                  Report ALL crimes to your local police department.

2.                  No fact is too trivial.

3.                  Report ANY and ALL suspicious activities in your neighborhood.

4.                  Get help immediately or call 9-1-1.

5.                  If the crime just occurred or is in progress, call 9-1-1.

6.                  Call a doctor, if necessary.

7.                  Call a friend or family member.

8.                  Try to remember ALL details, such as clothing, hair color, vehicle descriptions, identifiable marks or features, etc.

9.                  Try not to destroy any possible evidence.

10.              Keep important emergency and non-emergency numbers available, such as victim’s services, crime stoppers, police department, vehicle abatement, animal control, etc.

For more information about crime and emergencies, please don’t hesitate to contact your local police department or community service officer.

If you’re interested in starting a neighborhood watch:

http://www.usaonwatch.org/

http://www.neighborhoodlink.com/article/Community/Neighborhood_Watch_How_To_Start

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Blog: www.authorjenniferchase.com/
Website: www.jenniferchase.vpweb.com/
Crime Watch Blog: www.emilystonecrimewatch.wordpress.com/
Book & Crime Talk: www.blogtalkradio.com/jennifer-chase/
Books: Compulsion = Dead Game = Silent Partner = Screenwriting

In my novels Compulsion and Dead Game, Emily Stone relentlessly searches down the bad guys.  You could say that she is stalking them in order to bring them to justice.

But what does stalking really mean?

The definition of stalking is the act of following prey stealthily.

Stalking is caused by a chronic obsessive personality.  Anyone can become a victim or a stalker.  It has been estimated that one out of every twelve women will be a victim of a stalker at some point in their lives. 

What happens when someone is stalking another person?  There are stalking laws in place for this type of unwanted attention. 

The California Stalking Law Penal Code Section 646.9  is one of the strongest stalking laws in the country.  No Longer should victims of stalking be turned away by law enforcement and told, “come back when he actually hurts you.”  From 1991 through 1993, stalking was a misdemeanor punishable by only one year in county jail when no restraining order was in place.  Under the current law, a first-time stalker can be sentenced to a felony charge and sentenced to State Prison for up to three years.  If a court or restraining order is in effect, the stalker can be sentenced up to four years in prison or if he has previously been convicted of felony stalking or other related crimes, he could face up to five years in prison.

I’ve had first hand experience of being stalked by someone and it was a life altering experience for me.  I lived next door to a violent sociopath for 2 ½ years that threatened my life weekly, sometimes daily.  The good news is that I turned that unfortunate situation into a positive one by using my experience, or inspiration for lack of a better description, in my fictional writing and that’s how Compulsion came to life.  The bad news was that I had to move and this person continued to stalk me at work and even found my new residence.  Everything finally worked out.  I’m safe now and this person went to jail for a crime of aggravated assault on someone he knew, but unfortunately he’s out free again.

I wanted to share some stalker warning signs.

Stalkers usually have two or more of these personality traits:

1.                  Impulsive

2.                  Obsessive

3.                  Selfish

4.                  Won’t take “NO” for an answer.

5.                  Has few friends.

6.                  Low self-esteem.

In my situation, this person was also highly intelligent, clever, had violent tendencies, had one or two so-called friends that would follow his orders, and he felt that everyone had “wronged” him in some way.

The best approach to stop a stalker is to nip it in the bud, but this isn’t always the simplest approach.

What you can do to STOP the stalker:

1.                  NEVER let the stalker know that he’s having any effect on you.  I know this doesn’t sound easy, but it’s important.

2.                  Make sure you have a Caller ID on your phone.

3.                  If you’re being harassed by phone, make sure that it’s connected to a recorder to gather evidence.  Get a second line (unlisted) for your trusted friends or use a cell phone.

4.                  Have friends, family, neighbors, and coworkers help to shield you.

5.                  Get a camera cell phone (most cell phones have this feature now) and document everything and every encounter with this person.

6.                  Change your schedule to make it more difficult to follow you.

7.                  Drive around the block a couple of times before returning home.  If you are being followed or threatened drive straight to a police station.  Never confront this person alone.

8.                  Plan an escape route in case your stalker enters your home, follows you on foot, or follows you in the car.  It’s important to plan out what you would do in an escape and don’t let anxiety and fear cloud your judgment.

9.                  Find out all your options with restraining orders.  Talk to your local police department and file a report.  Law enforcement is there to help us.  From my own personal experience, the police were helpful and supportive of my situation. 

10.              Contact an attorney or your local police department for more information.

Be safe and alert at ALL times.  Don’t feel like you have to suffer through this alone.  Tell friends, family, and law enforcement.

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Blog: www.authorjenniferchase.com/
Website: www.jenniferchase.vpweb.com/
Crime Watch Blog: www.emilystonecrimewatch.wordpress.com/
Book & Crime Talk: www.blogtalkradio.com/jennifer-chase/
Books: Compulsion = Dead Game = Silent Partner = Screenwriting

Closed or solved homicides are described as either “cleared by arrest” or “cleared by exceptional means”.  In 2008, there were 16,272 reported homicides with a clearance rate of 64%.  That means that 5,858 homicides remain unsolved for that year.

According to the U.S. Department of Justice, the reporting law enforcement agency must adhere to specific guidelines for “cleared” homicides. 

 Cleared by Arrest: 

  • Suspect(s) were arrested.
  • Suspect(s) were charged with the commission of the offense.
  • Suspect(s) were turned over to the court for prosecution.

 Cleared by Exceptional Means:

  • The offender(s) have been identified.
  • Enough gathered evidence to support an arrest warrant, make a charge, and turn offender over to the court for prosecution.
  • The offender(s) exact location has been identified and can be brought into custody immediately.
  • Law enforcement has encountered a circumstance outside their control that prohibits the agency from arresting, charging, and prosecuting the offender.

Clearance rates seem to be declining over the years.  What appears to be the problem?  Not enough police personnel?  Not enough qualified detectives?  Are we raising too many killers?  Is murder just a part of our society? 

Here are some interesting statistics to ponder:

2008, 16,272 homicides, 64% clearance, 5,858 unsolved

2007, 16,929 homicides, 61% clearance, 6,602 unsolved

2006, 17,030 homicides, 61% clearance, 6,642 unsolved

2000, 15,586 homicides, 63% clearance, 5,767 unsolved

1990, 23,438 homicides, 67% clearance, 7,735 unsolved

1980, 23,040 homicides, 72% clearance, 6,451 unsolved

1975, 78% clearance rate

1970, 86% clearance rate

1965, 90% clearance rate

1960, 91% clearance rate

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Blog: www.authorjenniferchase.com/
Website: www.jenniferchase.vpweb.com/
Crime Watch Blog: www.emilystonecrimewatch.wordpress.com/
Book & Crime Talk: www.blogtalkradio.com/jennifer-chase/
Books: Compulsion = Dead Game = Silent Partner = Screenwriting